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So its January, the month of snow, cold, broken resolutions and the CES or consumer electronics show. This show is a wonderland and mecca for techies and takes place in Las Vegas and features most of the worlds leading electronics or electronic tool and gadget manufacturers. Also a number of their major suppliers are there and launch products at the show.

 

One of the highly talked about products comes from Corning Glass and is called Gorilla Glass 3 (http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/03/corning-gorilla-glass-3/).  This glass material that is present in a whole series of devices such as phones (iPhones), tablet computers, televisions and notebooks. In fact its currently available in 975 different models or devices and has sold more than 1Billion units to date. Gorilla glass was actually developed way back in 1960 but mothballed until Steve Jobs needed something scratch-proof for the screen of the original iPhone. Jobs had to convince Corning that the glass could be manufactured in sufficient quantities for the iPhone’s launch. It’s now used in almost all high-end smartphones, regardless of brand. The key point of these glass surfaces is to be scratch, crack or damage resistent, and to be of amazing optical quality and low weight. Corning set the performance standards for Gorilla Glass3 to be a three fold reduction of scratches in use, a 40% reduction in the number of visible scratches and a 50% boost in strength retained after a scratch occusrs on the surface, which means that partially scratched devices no longer spiderweb or crack in use after the initial scratch. In short the Corning aim was to "Shatter the status quo" of glass enabling larger, more durable, less sctrached or shattered devices.

 

This proces of demanding more from materials is at the heart of the technical advances that drives many advanced companies to investigate the chemical and structural nature of the materials that are at the heart of their new products. For example Corning a long time user of Materials Studio tehcnology from Accelrys (http://accelrys.com/resource-center/case-studies/pdf/corning.pdf) has used the technology to drive their product differentiation many different areas including nanotechnology, glass like materials, and a number of other applications including glass coatings, glass bonding and adhesion. http://accelrys.com/resource-center/case-studies/pdf/corning-case-study.pdf.

 

So it is very interesting to see in statements before the show (David Velasquez, Gorilla Glass' director of marketing and commercial operations) that Corning's team, by studying glass' atomic structure and bonding properties, were able to "invent another kind of glass" that made the substance less brittle, and less prone to scratches. Such innovations powered by scientific understanding and insights enables market disrupting change to be developed and gives companies competitive edges in an increasingly challenging and evolving market. Here is the introductory slide set that Corning used for the previous generation of Gorilla glass (http://www.corninggorillaglass.com/)  and we all look forward to their announcements and product launch at CES this week.

 

If you'd like to learn more about Accelrys Materials Studio, view our on-demand webinars that cover topics from new formulations approaches, materials degradation and much more.

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