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Sustainable Solutions, High-Throughput, and ACS

Posted by gxf on Mar 26, 2010 3:10:18 PM

“Chemistry for a Sustainable World” was the theme of the ACS spring meeting. My own interests, of course, are in modeling, and more recently in high-throughput computation. The Monday morning session of CINF was devoted to the application of this to electronic and optical materials. The presentations included both methodological approaches to materials discover and applications to specific materials, with a focus on materials for alternative energy.


Steven Kaye of Wildcat Discovery Technologies(located only about 4 km from Accelrys) talked about high-throughput experimental approaches for applications such as batteries, hydrogen storage, carbon capture, and more. The company can screen 1000’s of materials a week, and produce these in gm or kg quantities for scale-up. Impressive work.

 

Alan Aspuru-Guzik of Harvard’s Clean Energy Project talked about the search for improved photovoltaics. He uses a combination of CHARMm and QCHEM software

to help look for the best molecules possible for: organic photovoltaics to provide inexpensive solar cells, polymers for the membranes used in fuel cells for electricity generation, and how best to assemble the molecules to make those devices.


Uniquely, the project uses the IBM World Community Grid to sort through the myriad materials and perform these long, tedious calculations. You may remember this approach from the SETI (at) home, which was among the first to try this. This gives everyonethe chance to contribute to these research projects: you download software from their site, and it runs on your home computer like a screensaver: when your machine is idle, it’s contributing to the project. Prof. Aspuru-Guzik said that some folks are so enthusiastic that they actually purchase computers just to contribute resources to the project. It’s great to see this sort of commitment from folks who can probably never be individually recognized for their efforts.

 

I don’t want to make this blog too long, so great talks by Prof. Krishna Rajan (Iowa State), Prof. Geoffrey Hutchison (U of Pittsburgh), and Dr. Berend Rinderspacher (Army Research Labs) will be covered in the next blog.

 

I was also quite happy to see that the some of the themes in my presentation were echoed by the others – so I’m not out in left field after all! I’ll blog about my own talk later on, but here’s a quick summary: Like Prof. Aspuru-Guzik’s work we used high-throughput computation to explore new materials, but we were searching for improved Li-ion battery electrolytes. We developed a combinatorial library of leads, set up automated computations using Pipeline Pilot and semiempirical VAMP calculations, and examined the results for the best leads. Stay tuned for a detailed explanation and a link to the slides.

 

And keep an eye out, too, for the 2nd part of Michael Doyle's blog on Sustainabilty.

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